Halloween in the pandemic: Costumes and candy, at a distance

Ghosts, skeletons, princesses and black cats roamed the streets as usual this Halloween, but they kept their distance, wore face coverings and carried hand sanitizer in their quest for treats. Like with everything else this year, the pandemic also left its mark on Halloween. Parades, parties and haunted houses were canceled due to bans on large gatherings and concerns that spooky celebrations could spread the coronavirus. But across the U.S., parents and costumed kids found ways to preseve the essence of the holiday Saturday while also observing the rules of social distancing. In the Chicago suburb of Oak Park, Tomeka Ray took her 4-year-old daughter, Diamond, trick-or-treating in the afternoon. The girl, dressed as a princess, wore her mask and carried sanitizer, with more of the disinfecting gel in the car for good measure, Ray said, so “I wasn’t too worried.” At one home neighbors had rigged a remote treat-delivery system fashioned out of a ventilation tube, with a cardboard cutout at the end colored to make it look like a dragon’s mouth. “I like that. I really do. That’s the third house I’ve seen that has that,” Ray said. Caden Korchuk, 11, and friend Jayden Schoning, 10, both dressed as skeletons, also appreciated getting their candy delivered from a distance. “Everything out here is really cool because of all the chutes,” Korchuk said. In Glen Allen, Virginia, just outside Richmond, neighbors left individually wrapped bags of candy on tables at the end of driveways to avoid having dozens of kids coming to their doors and sticking their hands in the same big, germy candy bowls. Matt Cheadle, a 35-year-old furniture designer, called it “extremely” socially distanced trick-or-treating. Parker, his 5-year-old son, was going as Yoshi, the green…

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